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Gender of Nouns

Most nouns that end in "o"are considered masculine and those that end in "a" are considered feminine. For example:

Spanish

English

Masculino

Masculine

elteléfono

telephone

ellibro

book

Femenino

Feminine

lamanzana

apple

lamaestra

female tutor

 

Here are the most common exceptions where a masculine word ends in "a" and a feminine word ends in "o"

Spanish

English

Masculino

Masculine

el clima

climate

el día

day

el idioma

language

el mapa

map

el problema

problem

el programa

program

el sistema

system

el tema

thema

Feminino

Feminine

la foto (fotografía)

photo (photograph)

la mano

hand

la moto (motocicleta)

motorcycle

la clase

class

 
Nouns ending in -dad, -tad,-tud, -ción, and -umbre are always feminine, including their plural forms. Here are few examples: la composición, las composiciones

Spanish

English

Feminino

Feminine

la ciudad

city

la universidad

university

la acción

action

la meditación

meditation

la revolución

revolution

 

Nouns that end in -dor and -sor are typically masculine and can be converted to feminine by adding an "a" at the end.

Spanish

English

el trabajador

male worker

la trabajadora

female worker

 

The nouns for persons and animals will end in "o" if the are masculine and in "a" if they are feminine.

Spanish

English

el chico

boy

la chica

girl

el gato

mail cat

la gata

female cat

 

Some nouns and those that end in -ista, -ante, or -ente do not change for masculine or femine. The gender of these nouns is indicated by the definite article preceding it. For example,

Spanish

English

el joven

boy

la joven

girl

el estudiante

boy student

la estudiante

girl student